His name is a latinized version of Gerhard Kramer. In 1569 he created the first Mercator projection: a wall map of the world on 18 separate sheets entitled: “New and more complete representation of the terrestrial globe properly adapted for its use in navigation”. Author section6student Posted on January 6, 2016 January 6, 2016. An assessment of the navigational accuracy of the Mercator world map of 1569 is made, aimed at better understanding how the information was adapted from the contemporary cartography. Today its still in use for google maps. All the continents are shown in Mercator's 1569 world map, which used the projection that bears his name. Although Mercator is most famous for his projection, it does not actually feature in his atlas. The Mercator projection is a useful navigation tool, as a straight line on a Mercator map indicates a straight course, but it is not a practical world map, because of distortion of scale near the poles . The inspiration for Merqator came from Gerardus Mercator, a 16th-century cartographer from Belgium. Mercator projection and Meridional Parts. In 1569 he created the first Mercator projection: a wall map of the world on 18 separate sheets entitled: “New and more complete representation of the terrestrial globe properly adapted for its use in navigation”. The map Special cases include the Mercator map and the stereographic projection. The map is thereby conformal. It was created by Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569 – a time when Antarctica hadn’t even been discovered. The Mercator projection (/ m ər ˈ k eɪ t ər /) is a cylindrical map projection presented by Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. The Mercator map. Since 1569, the Mercator projection has defined the Earth.


Please see pictures provided. There are various trade-offs with any map style, and those trade-offs can vary depending on how the map is meant to be used. Mission San Xavier del Bac. Although planned as a purely maritime navigational aid, the map has become our planet’s primary cartographic representation. An additional feature of this projection is that all local shapes are accurate and correctly defined at infinitesimal scale. The most popular map projection in the world has been around for 448 years now. Its novel feature was that lines of longitude, latitude and rhomb lines all appeared as straight lines on the map. The techniques only involve elementary calculus and trigonometry. It was developed by Gerardus Mercator in 1569. Its novel feature was that lines of longitude, latitude and rhomb lines all appeared as straight lines on the map. In the Mercator projection (c. 1569), Greenland, which has 0.8 million square miles, is shown as being equal to Africa, which has 11.6 million square miles. Although landed as a purely maritime navigational aid, and despite four centuries of adaptations, criticism and misuse, the map has become one of our planets primary cartographic representations. Li Livres du Graunt Caam. Mercator Projection – 1569. However, the mathematical methodology of Mercator projection was not published until 1599 by an Englishman Edward Wright, who published a table of Meridional Parts. Its defect, It used a famous projection … The Mercator projection is a cylindrical map projection presented by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. Designed by the geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569 A.D, Mercator projection is simply a cylindrical map projection that represents the “earth globe” in a two-dimensional map. The projection is the most heavily used in our society, appearing everywhere from books to apps to Google Maps, and tends to be what most of us think of when pondering the world map. It became the standard map projection for navigation because it is unique in representing north as up and south as down everywhere while preserving local directions and shapes. The Web Mercator variant of the projection is the de facto standard for web maps and online services. A modern Mercator projection map. Instead it was published separately, in 1569, well before the first volume of his atlas. With any map projection style, the big challenge lies in depicting a spherical object as a 2D graphic. As a conformal projection, all local shapes are accurate and correctly defined at infinitesimal scale. The map is thereby conformal. 1 Introduction The starting point for this exposition is the Mercator map designed by the Flemish/German cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. However, it greatly distorts areas as we move away from the equator. It became the standard map projection for navigation because it is unique in representing north as up and south as down everywhere while preserving local directions and shapes. Title: Wv11700a.cdr Author: Paul B. Anderson Created Date: 8/20/2002 2:33:11 AM (In 1492, Christopher Columbus had discovered America by sailing all the way from Spain.) Since Gerardus Mercator presented his Mercator global map projection in 1569, numerous map projections have been developed and scores of projections are currently used by cartographers today. The Mercator projection was developed in 1569 by Gerardus Mercator as a navigation tool. 59-60). A good discussion of this can be found at the Diversophy site , including the following execerpt: The Mercator projection was invented by Gerardus Mercator, a Flemish mapmaker. Mercator (1569) Mercator is used for navigation or maps of equatorial regions. On December 2, 1594, German cartographer, philosopher and mathematician Gerardus Mercator passed away.He is best known for his work in cartography, particular the world map of 1569 based on a new projection which represented sailing courses of constant bearing as straight lines. He lived in a time when sailing across vast ocean distances was the norm. In 1569, the great cartographer, Gerardus Mercator, created a revolutionary new map based on a cylindrical projection. The result was Gerard Mercator’s enormous 1569 world map, called a ‘Description of the Earth for Use in Navigation’. His 1569 Mercator projection became the standard map projection for nautical purposes. Mercator; Creator: Gerardus Mercator (1569) Group: Cylindric : Property: Conformal: Other Names — Remarks: Cut off at 84° North and South: Jump to different depiction of this projection: Specified in [square brackets]: Actual size of the projection (minus the black or white background). In 1569, Gerardus Mercator wanted to make a global world map that would be useful for navigation. It was presented by Gerardus Mercator in 1569. The world map included in the atlas from 1595 is one produced by Mercator’s son, Rumold, using a pair of hemispherical projections (Monmonier, 2004, pp. What must be noted is that when the conversion is done from the globe to the flat surface, the east-west stretching is unavoidable. bert conic conformal projections. Share this: Twitter; Facebook; Like this: Related. The Mercator projection (/ m ər ˈ k eɪ t ər /) is a cylindrical map projection presented by Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. As regards the Arctic, the difficulty with the Mercator Projection is that to accurately depict the Polar Regions, his map would have to be infinitely tall. It is not a physical projection, and cannot be constructed using geometric tools. The infamous Mercator projection was originally created by Gerardus Mercator in 1569 to display accurate compass bearings for sea travel. His Mercator projection map, invented in 1569, was the primary map that navigators used for years. English: The Mercator projection is a cylindrical map projection presented by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. The Mercator map is a cylindrical map projection first introduced by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. The property of the Mercator projection map that made it useful to navigators is that it preserves angles. This map projection is practical for nautical applications due to its ability to represent lines of constant course, known as rhumb lines, as straight segments that conserve the angles with the meridians. It became the standard map projection for nautical purposes because of its ability to represent lines of constant course, known as rhumb lines or loxodromes, as straight segments. More information about the poster- Since 1569, the Mercator Projection has defined our idea of the Earth. The Mercator projection is a cylindrical map projection which is widely used in cartography today. Mercator was designed as a navigational tool for sailors as it was most convenient to hand-plot courses with parallel rules and triangles on this map. This is his famous world map of 1569. The Mercator projection was developed in 1569 by one of the most famous cartographers of all time, Gerardus Mercator (that's a 16 th century engraving of him in Figure 2). It became the standard map projection for nautical purposes because of its ability to represent lines of constant course, known as rhumb lines or loxodromes, as straight segments that conserve the angles with the meridians. Manila in the 16th Century. He is most renowned for creating in 1569 the first world map based on a new projection which represents any course of constant bearing as a straight line, a major innovation still used today. Mercator projection, a map projection introduced by Flemish cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. The first Mercator chart (the ordinary maps and charts used nowadays) was published by the Flemish cartographer, Gerardus Mercator in 1569. The Mercator projection is a cylindrical map projection presented by the Flemish geographer and cartographer Gerardus Mercator in 1569. Currently, British schools use and teach the Mercator projection map, made by Flemish cartographer Geradus Mercator in 1569. A map projection is an essential component of any modern map, and there are an infinite number of possible map projections. It's the form that many maps still come in today. Mercator's Arctic projection has its roots in his magnificent 1569 wall map of the world in which Mercator first introduces his revolutionary projection.